Healing Music Terms


 
clinical musician: a certified graduate of a music training programs. This programs include Music Practitioners, Music Therapists, Music Thanatologists, and Harp Practitioners. This title may not be used by non-certified musicians. (also called a therapeutic musician)
 
group music session: The attendance of a clinical musician with a group of patients. For entertainment purposes.
 
Group Music Therapy: An interactive session with a group of patients by a Music Therapist. (see also Music Therapy)
 
Harp Practitioner: (formal title) a graduate of the International Harp Therapy Program. Practitioner graduates use the small harp as a bedside instrument with the intention of supporting the recipient's goal of healing. This goal may be emotional, physical, mental or spiritual in nature. The soothing sounds of the harp not only can enhance the quality of life, but create the possibility of interactive work in which the recipient might play the harp. Working with the therapeutic harp is as varied as our clients. (also called a Harp Therapist)
 
Harp Therapist: (formal title) a graduate of the International Harp Therapy Program. Practitioner graduates use the small
harp as a bedside instrument with the intention of supporting the recipient's goal of healing. This goal may be emotional, physical, mental or spiritual in nature. The soothing sounds of the harp not only can enhance the quality of life, but create the possibility of interactive work in which the recipient might play the harp. Working with the therapeutic harp is as varied as our clients. (also called a Harp Practitioner)
 
Music Practitioner: (formal title) a certified graduate of the Music for Healing and Transition Program (MHTP); training includes medical-overview, deportment, and music training. Qualified for non-interactive music at the bedside. Many patients served by MP's are those who cannot interact or communicate; may be comatose, in ER, OR, post-op, etc.
 
music service: the musical attendance of a clinical musician at the bedside of any patient for at least 15 minutes. (also called a music session)
 
music session: the musical attendance of a clinical musician at the bedside of any patient for at least 15 minutes. (also called a music service)
 
Music Thanatologist: (formal title) a graduate of the Chalice of Repose Project. Chalice of Repose practitioners attend death bed vigils with live prescriptive music (voice and harp) played at the bedside. Prescriptive music is designed to respond to the individual needs and symptoms of each patient. Practitioners position themselves on either side of the dying patient and attentively work with musical deliveries to support and facilitate the unbinding process that is central to a conscious, peaceful, or blessed death. These clinical deliveries revolve around a body-systems phenomenology. Practitioners observe physiological changes in the patient's nervous, respiratory, circulatory, and metabolic systems. The musician-clinicians then surround and anoint the dying patient with music to stimulate or soothe specific processes in the physical body. This in turn affects emotional, mental, and spiritual dimensions in the individual. As evidenced by decreased pain, reduced physical and emotional anxiety, and deep slumber, the work has proven effective with patients with cancer, respiratory and infectious diseases, and the slowly moving degenerative diseases, such as dementia, Alzheimer's, and multiple sclerosis.
 
Music Therapist: (formal title) a graduate of one of 69 approved college music therapy curricula including internship are then eligible to sit for the national examination offered by the Certification Board for Music Therapists. Music therapists who successfully complete the independently administered examination hold the music therapist-board certified credential (MT-BC). The National Music Therapy Registry (NMTR) serves qualified music therapy professionals with the following designations: RMT, CMT, ACMT. These individuals have met accepted educational and clinical training standards and are qualified to practice music therapy.
Music therapists assess emotional well-being, physical health, social functioning, communication abilities, and cognitive skills through musical responses; design music sessions for individuals and groups based on client needs using music improvisation, receptive music listening, song writing, lyric discussion, music and imagery, music performance, and learning through music; participate in interdisciplinary treatment planning, ongoing evaluation, and follow up.
 
Music Therapy: An interactive session with a patient by a Music Therapists. Music Therapists assess emotional well-being, physical health, social functioning, communication abilities, and cognitive skills through musical responses; design music sessions for individuals and groups based on client needs using music improvisation, receptive music listening, song writing, lyric discussion, music and imagery, music performance, and learning through music; participate in interdisciplinary treatment planning, ongoing evaluation, and follow up.
 
performance: A concert. This is not done in clinical settings or at the bedside except in day rooms.
 
therapeutic musician: a certified graduate of a music training programs. This programs include Music Practitioners, Music Therapists, Music Thanatologists, and Harp Practitioners. This title may not be used by non-certified musicians. (also called a clinical musician)
 
vigil: the musical attendance of a clinical musician at the bedside of an actively dying patient, for at least 45 minutes or through death.
 

This page was created on March 14, 2001. This page was last updated on March 14, 2001.